What Does the Expression “Dyed In the Wool” Mean and Where Does it Come From?

The expression “dyed in the wool” describes someone whose thoughts on politics or religion just can’t be changed.

The original meaning of the phrase was applied to the dying of raw wool, which, if done in bulk before being combed or woven, holds its color much longer than wool dyed after processing.

Today, the phrase “dyed in the wool” means that like the color in the unprocessed yarn, convictions ingrained early, during childhood, will last the longest.

We often describe someone with deeply held beliefs as “dyed in the wool”.

About Karen Hill

Karen Hill is a freelance writer, editor, and columnist. Born in New York, her work has appeared in the Examiner, Yahoo News, Buzzfeed, among others.

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