What Does the Phrase “Bob’s Your Uncle” Mean and Where Did the Expression Come From?

“Bob’s your uncle” is a common British phrase and now means that you’ve accomplished something without much effort.

It originated in 1887 when Prime Minister Robert Cecil appointed his nephew, Arthur Balfour, chief secretary for Ireland.

The public was outraged at this blatant act of nepotism and began using “Bob’s your uncle” to describe any situation where favoritism influenced the outcome.

About Karen Hill

Karen Hill is a freelance writer, editor, and columnist. Born in New York, her work has appeared in the Examiner, Yahoo News, Buzzfeed, among others.

1 thought on “What Does the Phrase “Bob’s Your Uncle” Mean and Where Did the Expression Come From?”

  1. If your only allowed to go a certain speed on highways, and roads why do they make it that cars can go above 65?

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