What Is the Ozone Hole, What Caused the Ozone Hole, and What Are the Consequences Of Ozone Layer Depletion?

A break, or hole, in the ozone layer in Earth’s stratosphere exists over the southern polar region of Earth.

This hole allows ultraviolet light from the Sun to reach Earth undiluted by ozone.

There has historically been disagreement over whether this hole is a natural phenomenon or the result of man-made pollutants.

But we now know chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) compounds are transported into the stratosphere after being emitted at the surface of the earth.

The catalytic destruction of ozone is caused by atomic chlorine and bromine.

Chlorine and bromine are formed from the photodissociation of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) compounds.

It is suspected that a variety of biological consequences such as increases in skin cancer, cataracts,[3] damage to plants, and reduction of plankton populations in the ocean’s photic zone may result from the increased UV exposure due to ozone depletion.

Increases in skin cancer, cataracts, a reduction of plankton populations in the ocean, and other biological consequences may be a result from the increased UV exposure due to ozone depletion.

About Karen Hill

Karen Hill is a freelance writer, editor, and columnist. Born in New York, her work has appeared in the Examiner, Yahoo News, Buzzfeed, among others.

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