Does Everyone Have a Blind Spot?

Yes, but it is nothing to be alarmed about. A blind spot is simply a point at which you might hold a small object and cannot see it.

This happens because there is one point on your retina where the optic nerve leaves your eye, just below the center of the back of your eye, and no picture images are received.

This point is not sensitive to light, so if an image hits this area, it is invisible to the eye. When you look at this same object from a distance, your brain fills in this blind spot and you see a total picture.

Try this experiment to see where your blind spot is.

Have this page about 12 inches in front of you. Close your left eye and open your right eye. Look steadily at the dot on the left. Now move your head slowly toward your screen, then away from it.

At one point, the right-hand dot disappears completely. It is at this point that the dot’s image falls exactly on your blind spot.

About Karen Hill

Karen Hill is a freelance writer, editor, and columnist. Born in New York, her work has appeared in the Examiner, Yahoo News, Buzzfeed, among others.

4 thoughts on “Does Everyone Have a Blind Spot?”

  1. Molly Parker-Nash, every vertebrate has a blind spot. So yes you do have one, you likely did the test wrong. That is unless you are an octopus, cephalopods don’t have a blind spot.

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