What Does the Phrase “It’s Neither Rhyme Nor Reason” Mean and Where Did it Come From?

When you say that something is “neither rhyme nor reason,” you are quoting Sir Thomas More.

After reading something a friend had written, Sir Thomas told him that he would have to rewrite it in order to make his point clear.

After his friend reworked the manuscript, More read it again, and this time he approved, commenting:

“That’s better, it’s rhyme now anyway. Before it was neither rhyme nor reason.”

About Karen Hill

Karen Hill is a freelance writer, editor, and columnist. Born in New York, her work has appeared in the Examiner, Yahoo News, Buzzfeed, among others.

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