Who invented the Golden Rule “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”?

Since the idea is so simple, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”, most religions and philosophies have some variation of the Golden Rule.

However, the earliest known rendition came from Confucius (551-479 B.C.):

“What you do not wish for yourself, do not do to others.”

In other words, don’t screw with people. Karma is a bitch.

About Karen Hill

Karen Hill is a freelance writer, editor, and columnist. Born in New York, her work has appeared in the Examiner, Yahoo News, Buzzfeed, among others.

1 thought on “Who invented the Golden Rule “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”?”

  1. Actually, the oldest recorded example of the golden rule can be found in the Jewish Torah, and Code of Hammurabi (1780 BC). The christian era “golden rule” is derived from Leviticus 19:18 and is expressed in Luke 10:25-28

    25And one day an authority on the law stood up to put Jesus to the test. “Teacher,” he asked, “what must I do to receive eternal life?”

    26What is written in the Law?” Jesus replied. “How do you understand it?”

    27He answered, “ ‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul. Love him with all your strength and with all your mind.’(Deuteronomy 6:5) And, ‘Love your neighbor as you love yourself.’ ”

    28“You have answered correctly,” Jesus replied. “Do that, and you will live.”

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